Tag Archives: organic

Past Sunday as the season winds down.

  
Another unseasonably warm day for November in upstate New York.

  
With a month more of the 2015 CSA season, roots & greens are in abundance.

  
Most of the winter squash plants succumbed to the heavy summer rains (*sniff*), but thankfully there are some that made it through…

  
Bob bagging greens for the large shares… (small shares received spinach). 

Note the t-shirt in mid-November.

  

  
I’ve really enjoyed this year working at Nook & Cranny

Some of the workers have moved on to their “winter jobs”, so the crew is small these days…

I miss their presence.

  
The confluence of people’s efforts & the elements showing up as vegetables is a constant amazement.


Today.

Morning sun shone through a crystal before a work day at Nook & Cranny.

Thanks, Mom!

  
That’s Soandso.

  
Couch buddy & travel companion.

  
Beautiful breezy day

Pink ball shows signs of children from the evening before…

  
Boxes building up through the day

  
My favorite view

  

Greens (parsley, kale, lettuce, lettuce mix, endive, Brussels sprouts) covering up sweet potatoes, red potatoes, hakurai turnips, cilantro, carrots, acorn squash, onion, garlic, parsnips, spinach…


Harvest & seeding day at Nook & Cranny (take 2).

  
Can you see the hot?

It was warm this past Sunday. 

I tried to post on Monday, but there are many photos & my phone dropped the thread & so none of it was saved…

  
Sooooo, Take 2.

It was the second to last day of seeding for the 2015 season, & Sebastian was holding down the Yin.

During a pause while filling trays, I asked Bob if he could let me know before the cover-plastic was unrolled so I could take a photo of the boxes…  
 He asked if instead I’d take photos of the boxes as they were filled up through the day…

 Seriously, I have the cushy job.

I’ll try to keep the small & large boxes in order (I’ll be more methodical next time)

Above, the top box is the large, their tomato box comes later.

the bottom box (the one with the 1/2 peck box of tomatoes) is the small.

Back to the seeding…  
24 trays in all

10 Spinach, 4 Sylvetta Arugula, 4 Lettuce, 2 Red Pac Choi, 2 Red Mustard, 2 Mizuna.

   
 
“The Nusery”

   
 
The ones outside a little further along.

All these greens will head to the hoop houses & high tunnels in time.

  
Chard drip-draining before being set into boxes.

   
 
Small on top, Large below.

  
Bob sets leeks into the Large boxes.

 “Shining the zucchini” with a cloth, removing any stuck on stuff from the field.

   
 
Small on top, large on bottom.

  
I’ve tried three times to load a short video of Garrett’s hands washing carrots, but WP on my phone keeps crashing.

Suffice it to say that Bob intends to invest in a rotating drum spray method for next season. Garrett is super fast on the sprayer, but I guess the rotating drum is a faster way.

  
Into the box they go.

 Edamame happy dance!

Those were seeded in early June & here they are!!
One of the workers generously gave me a mounded quart full. One of the many benefits of working here.    

 
Here are two “smalls”

Bob knows details about each CSA member regarding any vegetables they may need to avoid…

So every now and again, some of the boxes will have slightly different contents.

   
   
You’d never know there was a lot of vegetable action going on underneath this layer of leafy greens.

    
Large boxes with tomatoes on top, a final sweep of vegetable droppings, plastic comes over, & Bob sets out Brussels Sprout tops at the “extras” area.

   
 Mmmm. Basil.

 
Week 14 ready for pick-up.

Did I mention it was hot?

It was SO hot & all the workers were amazing & lunch was a time of great delight & welcomed rest.  

Blessings on Late Summer.


Seeding day at Nook & Cranny farm.

The hillside has that Late Summer yellow tinge…  
It was also a harvest day today for the upcoming markets on Tuesday, Wednesday, & Thursday.

Lots of planting was occurring as well.

There’s always a lot going on at the farm.

  
Fortunate me, I was joined by Other for most of the day.

  
Much to do. Last couple weeks for seeding. 24 trays today.

12 Spinach, 4 Raab, 2 Mustard, 4 Red Pac Choi, 2 Mizuna.

  
Winter greens beginning.

It’s getting full in the barn!

  
(From yesterday’s CSA pick-up)

  
One of the workers commented today how it must be neat to have touched nearly every vegetable grown on the farm.

  
I think about that when I’m in the kitchen, preparing my vegetables to eat.

  
Well, I didn’t touch every seed, but I did touch most of them.

  
I guess I’m mostly proud & awed by the alliums… As they were seeded in the bitter cold days of February.

And here the onions today! They did well, & are drying down nicely.

  
The Winter Squash crop didn’t fare so well, as the bed location was flooded during the rainy spells, unfortunately.

  
At least there’s some that made it this far.

& thank goodness for the other farms in the area!

  
Babies all grown up!


Harvest & Seeding day at Nook & Cranny.

  
A beautiful day

22 trays of seeding – Spinach, Mustard, Arugula, Pac Choi, & Broccoli Raab.

Thankfully, not as hot as last week.

  
Beautiful layering of the CSA boxes

  
Top layer & whopper lettuce hides the goodness below

  
The interns & farm workers each & every week do such an amazing job!

Blessings on the harvest.


Jumble of photos from Nook & Cranny Farm.

  
the past two Sunday’s I’ve been away – the Garlic Pull at Sara’s farm, then at a friend’s wedding.

  
I’ve been making up time on alternate days, but haven’t kept all the photos straight, so here’s a jumble of recent photos from the past couple of weeks from Nook & Cranny.

  
 
The usual first photo upon arrival…

  
Often followed by a friendly greeting by Other.

  
The onions have mostly been harvested & are now curing in various locations around the farm

  
It’s always an exciting moment for me, as they were seeded back in the bitter cold time of February & March…

  
Sometimes they grow a bit wild…

  
Yippee! Okra!!

  
Tomatoes coming in & the Barred Rocks from this year have begun laying their eggs

So cute!

  
Wise birds, they stay out of the high heat of the day…

  
A smaller hoop house with cucumbers, peppers, & tomatoes.

  
Here’s a tour of the large hoop house where most of the tomatoes are planted.

   
 I was struck by the, um, what I call “tomato dust” contrasting with the purple cherry tomato.

Feel free to educate me on the proper name for this aromatic stuff of the tomato plant.

  
Bob grows many varieties of peppers, but Serrano is my favorite.

  
Today’s arrival as harvest was underway…

  
Shallots!!!

  
Beginning the box…

   
   
Totes, baskets, & wheelbarrows filled with August goodness ready for distribution in the barn…

   
    
 Abundance & beauty

  
This wheelbarrow will be steadily filled as harvest unfolds with “thirds” & culled vegetables which will be fed to the pigs.

  
Plantlings are coming up well…

I’ll put up another post about the fall planting…

  
More onions curing in the greenhouse, & the allium tally written on the chalkboard.

I cut my workday short due to a migraine…

Feeling much better now – more to come.

  

 


Garlic pull – Little.

  
My little bed of garlic turned out to be quite productive this year.

& while I intentionally planted “doubles” in order to get smaller bulbs (they keep better), well, they weren’t exactly smaller.

  
I’m not complaining… Just surprised, is all.

I wasn’t in my own garden much this year.

Work, depression, fatigue…

My gratitude for the rain that came, for the weeds which provided moisture retention, & the owners of the land who took off the scapes.

  
The Ukrainian & Romainian varieties yielded the most bulbs. 

Above are 52 stalks of the Ukrainian variety.

  
Quack grass roots. Hrumph. This will go into the cull pile to be eaten right away.

  
I’m digging my garlic late, & this is one of the reasons why getting garlic out of the ground in time is important: the garlic begins to sort of “grow out” from  its skin.

  
And the skin on the stem can separate from the bulb… 

Ah well.

  
Fortunately, there were only about 8 culled bulbs out of about 150.

  
That means plenty for seed, sharing, & through Winter & Spring!

  
  
Clinging to a buckwheat leaf wrapped around a garlic stalk was this gorgeous snowy moth.

I asked an ornithologist friend who is also a, um, moth-person which type of moth this was…

Virginian Tiger Moth!

  
Thank you garlic!

Thank you earth & elements!

& much gratitude &  thanks to all you readers who for whatever reason, brings you to this blog.